Local Connectivity, New York State

Metadata Updated: November 12, 2020

Resilience concerns the ability of a living system to adjust to climate change, to moderate potential damages, to take advantage of opportunities, or to cope with consequences; in short, its capacity to adapt. In this project we aim to identify the most resilient examples of key geophysical settings (e.g. sand plains, granite mountains, limestone valleys, etc.) in New york State to provide conservationists with a nuanced picture of the places where conservation is most likely to succeed over centuries.

The project had three parts: 1) identifying and mapping the geophysical settings, 2) developing a quantitative estimate of resilience for each setting based on landscape complexity and permeability, and 3) identifying key linkages that may be important in facilitating climate-induced regional movements. The final products include the identification of sites with high or low estimated resilience and overlays of these sites with the TNC portfolio of important biodiversity sites. The products were presented in an ecoregional context, highlighting sites with the highest estimated resilience for each setting within each ecoregion.

Local Connectedness estimates the degree of connectedness of a cell with its surroundings within a three km radius. The method used to map local connectedness for the region was resistant kernel analysis, developed and run by Brad Compton using software developed by the UMASS CAPS program (http://www.umass.edu/landeco/research/caps/caps.html). The theoretical spread of a species or process outward from a focal cell is a function of the resistance values of the neighboring cells and their distance from the focal cell out to a maximum distance of three kilometers.

This file contains the 1000 acre hexagons used as the primary unit of analysis for the resilience analysis and the attribute table contains the key attributes for basic interpertation of the results. The key fields include state, ecoregion, geophysical setting, final resilience score stratified by setting and ecoregion, final resilience score stratified by setting and ecoregion classified into categories, landscape complexity category, and local connectedness category. For more detailed information please see the report and dataset download available at: http://conserveonline.org/workspaces/ecs/documents/resilient-sites-for-terrestrial-conservation-1.

Access & Use Information

License: No license information was provided. If this work was prepared by an officer or employee of the United States government as part of that person's official duties it is considered a U.S. Government Work.

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Dates

Metadata Date August 20, 2018
Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 12, 2020
Reference Date(s) 2016-10-17T20:09:10+00:00 (creation), 2016-12-02T22:22:00+00:00 (lastUpdate), 2014 (publication)
Frequency Of Update

Metadata Source

Harvested from DOI Open Data

Additional Metadata

Resource Type Dataset
Metadata Date August 20, 2018
Metadata Created Date November 12, 2020
Metadata Updated Date November 12, 2020
Reference Date(s) 2016-10-17T20:09:10+00:00 (creation), 2016-12-02T22:22:00+00:00 (lastUpdate), 2014 (publication)
Responsible Party (Point of Contact); North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (Point of Contact)
Contact Email
Guid 58052fe6e4b0824b2d1c1e05
Access Constraints
Bbox East Long -65.862067
Bbox North Lat 49.418329
Bbox South Lat 34.531317
Bbox West Long -83.675413
Coupled Resource
Frequency Of Update
Licence
Metadata Language
Metadata Type geospatial
Progress completed
Spatial Data Service Type
Spatial Reference System
Spatial Harvester True

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